James Batcho, PhD

jimbatcho.com

Documentary Film: Constancy & Change (2013)

Constancy & Change is a documentary about traditional Korean artists, and how they sustain their craft in the modern world. In April, 2013, this film was shown at an exhibition in Milan, Italy. Click the image link to the right to view the full 60-minute documentary on Youtube.

My credits: sound and music editor, final mix. Directed by Chul Heo (©2013).


Links to Various Film & Video Projects, 2012 and prior

Documentary Film: Ari Ari the Korean Cinema [영화판] (2012)

     •     2012: A music video for Poko Lambro's song "Home." (dir. Ryan Gibson) You can see it here.

My credits: picture editor, second camera, co-concept


     •     2011: An experimental short film called Another Please. (dir. Jon Hardy)

My credits: sound designer


2010: Busan Battle of the Bands (Allive Event Management & Production).

Video one: The Headaches

Video two: Southbay

My credits: picture editor


This documentary film about the history of Korean cinema premiered at the Pusan International Film Festival in Oct. 2011, then was released to theaters nation-wide (South Korea) on Dec. 6, 2012. (©Mountain Pictures)

Directors Chul Heo and Ji-young Chung (©2011 Aura Pictures, Enter Cinema; ©2012 Mountain Pictures).

My credits: music supervisor and sound designer.

Click below to view clips of certain sections of the film. These clips have been edited to showcase aspects of music editing, dialogue and sound effects editing or sound design, and are different from the sequence of the original film.


TV Show: The Job (2005)

Audiovisual

You may also download these clips by clicking the corresponding image links below.


One of the projects I worked on for Digitrove was a TV show that ran for one season, 13 episodes, called The Job. I supervised all the show's audio needs and personally did all sound and music editing and mixing. Here is the title sequence.


Early Sound Design Work: Flow (2004) and Arcs of Texture (2005)

While doing independent studies at SFSU's Cinema program, I met Ken Rosenthal. He and I worked on two projects together: Flow and Arcs of Texture. I was credited as sound designer for both projects, which also included all recording and mixing.

Flow (edit, 2:03) was devoid of any sound when he screened it for me. I was immediately taken by the visual and narrative themes and its experimental approach. Its ocean "setting" being allegorical, I wanted to do something similarly abstract but which built a complementary world. I decided to use percussion cymbals as the main sources of texture. When sustained, they provided an ambience, and when struck with sand, mallets, brushes or other objects, they provided some needed sync sound. Assembly, design and mixing was very quick in order to work improvisationally.

Arcs of Texture (edit, 2:09) is a film that shows urban life from above and below San Francisco. Ken already had music for the bright, above ground scenes. It was my job to provide sound for the city's darker subterranean world. I recorded numerous sounds of San Francisco's MUNI and BART stations, including trains, escalators, people, voices, ambiences, and added a hint of programmed electronics. Often, the images that are seen have sounds of other object-events, creating a new synchresis.